Definition:Matrix Product

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Definition

Matrix Product (Conventional)

Let $\struct {R, +, \circ}$ be a ring.

Let $\mathbf A = \sqbrk a_{m n}$ be an $m \times n$ matrix over $R$.

Let $\mathbf B = \sqbrk b_{n p}$ be an $n \times p$ matrix over $R$.

Then the matrix product of $\mathbf A$ and $\mathbf B$ is written $\mathbf A \mathbf B$ and is defined as follows.

Let $\mathbf A \mathbf B = \mathbf C = \sqbrk c_{m p}$.


Then:

$\displaystyle \forall i \in \closedint 1 m, j \in \closedint 1 p: c_{i j} = \sum_{k \mathop = 1}^n a_{i k} \circ b_{k j}$


Thus $\sqbrk c_{m p}$ is the $m \times p$ matrix where each entry $c_{i j}$ is built by forming the (ring) product of each entry in the $i$'th row of $\mathbf A$ with the corresponding entry in the $j$'th column of $\mathbf B$ and adding up all those products.


This operation is called matrix multiplication, and $\mathbf C$ is the matrix product of $\mathbf A$ with $\mathbf B$.


Matrix Scalar Product

Let $\struct {R, +, \circ}$ be a ring.

Let $\mathbf A = \sqbrk a_{m n}$ be an $m \times n$ matrix over $\struct {R, +, \circ}$.

Let $\lambda \in R$ be any element of $R$.


The scalar product of $\lambda$ and $\mathbf A$ is defined as follows.

Let $\lambda \circ \mathbf A = \mathbf C$.

Then:

$\forall i \in \closedint 1 m, j \in \closedint 1 n: c_{i j} = \lambda \circ a_{i j}$


Thus $\sqbrk c_{m n}$ is the $m \times n$ matrix composed of the scalar product of $\lambda$ and the corresponding elements of $\mathbf A$.


Commutative Matrix Product

Definition:Commutative Matrix Product

Kronecker Product

Also known as matrix direct product:


Let $\mathbf A = \sqbrk a_{m n}$ and $\mathbf B = \sqbrk b_{p q}$ be matrices.

The Kronecker product of $\mathbf A$ and $\mathbf B$ is denoted $\mathbf A \otimes \mathbf B$ and is defined as the block matrix:

$\mathbf A \otimes \mathbf B = \begin{bmatrix} a_{11} \mathbf B & a_{12} \mathbf B & \cdots & a_{1n} \mathbf B \\ a_{21} \mathbf B & a_{22} \mathbf B & \cdots & a_{2n} \mathbf B \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ a_{m1} \mathbf B & a_{m2} \mathbf B & \cdots & a_{mn} \mathbf B \end{bmatrix}$


Writing this out in full:

$\mathbf A \otimes \mathbf B = \begin{bmatrix} a_{11} b_{11} & a_{11} b_{12} & \cdots & a_{11} b_{1q} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{11} & a_{1n} b_{12} & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{1q} \\ a_{11} b_{21} & a_{11} b_{22} & \cdots & a_{11} b_{2q} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{21} & a_{1n} b_{22} & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{2q} \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots & & & \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ a_{11} b_{p1} & a_{11} b_{p2} & \cdots & a_{11} b_{pq} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{p1} & a_{1n} b_{p2} & \cdots & a_{1n} b_{pq} \\ \vdots & \vdots & & \vdots & \ddots & & \vdots & \vdots & & \vdots \\ \vdots & \vdots & & \vdots & & \ddots & \vdots & \vdots & & \vdots \\ a_{m1} b_{11} & a_{m1} b_{12} & \cdots & a_{m1} b_{1q} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{11} & a_{mn} b_{12} & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{1q} \\ a_{m1} b_{21} & a_{m1} b_{22} & \cdots & a_{m1} b_{2q} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{21} & a_{mn} b_{22} & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{2q} \\ \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots & & & \vdots & \vdots & \ddots & \vdots \\ a_{m1} b_{p1} & a_{m1} b_{p2} & \cdots & a_{m1} b_{pq} & \cdots & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{p1} & a_{mn} b_{p2} & \cdots & a_{mn} b_{pq} \end{bmatrix}$


Thus, if:

$\mathbf A$ is a matrix with dimensions $m \times n$
$\mathbf B$ is a matrix with dimensions $p \times q$

then $\mathbf A \otimes \mathbf B$ is a matrix with dimensions $m p \times n q$.


Hadamard Product

Also known as Matrix Entrywise Product or Schur Product:


Let $\struct {R, +_R, \times_R}$ be a ring.

Let $\mathbf A = \sqbrk a_{m n}$ be an $m \times n$ matrix over $R$.

Let $\mathbf B = \sqbrk b_{m n}$ be an $m \times n$ matrix over $R$.


The Hadamard product of $\mathbf A$ and $\mathbf B$ is written $\mathbf A \circ \mathbf B$ and is defined as follows:

$\mathbf A \circ \mathbf B := \mathbf C = \sqbrk c_{m n}$

where:

$\forall i \in \closedint 1 m, j \in \closedint 1 n: c_{i j} = a_{i j} \times_R b_{i j}$


Frobenius Inner Product

Definition:Frobenius Inner Product

Cracovian

Definition:Cracovian

Also see

There are more specialized matrix products for vectors expressed as matrices:


Linguistic Note

Some older sources use the term matric multiplication instead of matrix multiplication.

Strictly speaking it is more correct, as matric is the adjective formed from the noun matrix, but it is a little old-fashioned and is rarely found nowadays.


Sources