Definition:Number Names/Welsh

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Definition

These are the names of the numbers in Welsh:

\((1)\)   $:$   un             
\((2)\)   $:$   dau, dwy             
\((3)\)   $:$   toi, tair             
\((4)\)   $:$   pedwar, pedair             
\((5)\)   $:$   pump (or pum)             
\((6)\)   $:$   chwech (or chwe)             
\((7)\)   $:$   saith             
\((8)\)   $:$   wyth             
\((9)\)   $:$   naw             
\((10)\)   $:$   deg             
\((11)\)   $:$   un ar ddeg             
\((12)\)   $:$   deuddeg             
\((13)\)   $:$   toi ar ddeg, tair ar ddeg             
\((14)\)   $:$   pedwar ar ddeg, pedair ar ddeg             
\((15)\)   $:$   pymtheg             
\((16)\)   $:$   un ar bymtheg             
\((17)\)   $:$   dau ar bymtheg, dwy ar bymtheg             
\((18)\)   $:$   deunaw             
\((19)\)   $:$   pedwar ar bymtheg, pedair ar bymtheg             
\((20)\)   $:$   ugain             
\((30)\)   $:$   deg ar hugain             
\((40)\)   $:$   dugain             
\((50)\)   $:$   deg ar deugain or hanner cant             
\((60)\)   $:$   trigain             
\((70)\)   $:$   trigain a deg or deg ar thrigain             
\((80)\)   $:$   pedwar ugain             
\((90)\)   $:$   pedwar ugain a deg or deg a phedwar ugain             
\((100)\)   $:$   cant             

The different forms for $2$, $3$, $4$ and their derivatives are for masculine and feminine.

The different forms for $5$ and $6$ are elisions for use in front of certain letters.

The different forms for $50$, $70$ and $90$ are separate ways of saying the numbers.


Note:

there are no distinct words for $11$ and $12$, indicating that there has been less influence of duodecimal systems on Welsh
there are clear indications of base $5$ and vigesimal influences as well as decimal
the interesting forms for $18$ (expressed as $2 \times 9$) and $50$ (expressed both as $10 + 40$ and $\dfrac 1 2 \times 100$).


Sources