Mathematician:Augustus De Morgan

From ProofWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Mathematician

British mathematician and logician best known for De Morgan's laws.

Also introduced and made rigorous the Principle of Mathematical Induction.

Did considerable work on the logic of relations.


Nationality

British


History

  • Born: 27 June 1806 in Madurai, Madras Presidency, British Raj (now India)
  • Died: 18 March 1871 in London, England


Theorems

Results named for Augustus De Morgan can be found here.


Publications

  • 1836: An Explanation of the Gnomonic Projection of the Sphere
  • 1837: Elements of Trigonometry, and Trigonometrical Analysis
  • 1837: The Elements of Algebra
  • 1838: An Essay on Probabilities
  • 1840: The Elements of Arithmetic
  • 1840: First Notions of Logic, Preparatory to the Study of Geometry
  • 1840: Edited Barlow's Tables, 2nd ed.
  • 1842: The Differential and Integral Calculus
  • 1845: The Globes, Celestial and Terrestrial
  • 1847: Formal Logic or The Calculus of Inference
  • October 1848: Short Supplementary Remarks on the first six Books of Euclid's The Elements (in the Companion to the [British] Almanac, 1849)
  • 1849: Trigonometry and Double Algebra
  • 1860: Syllabus of a Proposed System of Logic
  • 1872: A Budget of Paradoxes


Notable Quotes

It is easier to square the circle than to get round a mathematician.
-- Quoted in 1937: Eric Temple Bell: Men of Mathematics: They Say: What Say They? : Let Them Say


There never has been, and till we see it we never shall believe that there can be, a system of geometry worthy of the name, which has any material departures (we do not speak of corrections or extensions or developments) from the plan laid down by Euclid.
-- October 1848: Short Supplementary Remarks on the first six Books of Euclid's The Elements


Plato's writings do not convince any mathematician that their author was strongly addicted to geometry ... We know that he encouraged mathematics ... But if -- which nobody believes -- the μηδειϛ άγεωμέτρητος εἰσίτω [Let no man ignorant of geometry enter] of Tzetzes had been written over his gate, it would no more have indicated the geometry within than a warning not to forget to bring a packet of sandwiches would now give promise of a good dinner.
-- Quoted in 1937: Eric Temple Bell: Men of Mathematics: They Say: What Say They? : Let Them Say


Also known as

Some sources refer to him as Augustus de Morgan, that is, with a lowercase d.


Sources