8

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Number

$8$ (eight) is:

$2^3$


The base of the octal number system


The number of pairs of twin primes less than $100$


The $1$st power of $8$ after the zeroth $1$:
$8 = 8^1$


The $1$st element of the $1$st pair of consecutive powerful numbers:
$8 = 2^3$, $9 = 3^2$


The $1$st number in English alphabetical sequence


The $2$nd cube number after $1$:
$8 = 2^3$


The $2$nd of the only two cubic Fibonacci numbers after $1$:
$8 = 3 + 5$


The $2$nd octagonal number after $1$:
$8 = 1 + 7 = 2 \paren {3 \times 2 - 2}$


The $2$nd heptagonal pyramidal number after $1$:
$8 = 1 + 7 = \dfrac {2 \paren {2 + 1} \paren {5 \times 2 - 2} } 6$


The $2$nd Kaprekar triple after $1$:
$8^3 = 512 \to 5 + 1 + 2 = 8$


The $2$nd palindromic cube after $1$:
$8 = 2^3$


The $3$rd integer after $0$, $1$ equal to the sum of the digits of its cube:
$8^3 = 512$, while $5 + 1 + 2 = 8$


The $3$rd power of $2$ after $(1)$, $2$, $4$:
$8 = 2^3$


The $3$rd powerful number after $1$, $4$


The $3$rd element of the Fermat set after $1$, $3$


The $4$th almost perfect number after $1$, $2$, $4$:
$\map \sigma 8 = 15 = 2 \times 8 - 1$


The $4$th of the $5$ known powers of $2$ whose digits are also all powers of $2$:
$1$, $2$, $4$, $8$, $\ldots$


The $4$th even number after $2$, $4$, $6$ which cannot be expressed as the sum of $2$ composite odd numbers


The $4$th integer $m$ after $0$, $1$, $2$ such that $m^2 = \dbinom n 0 + \dbinom n 1 + \dbinom n 2 + \dbinom n 3$ for integer $n$:
$8^2 = \dbinom 7 0 + \dbinom 7 1 + \dbinom 7 2 + \dbinom 7 3$


The $5$th positive integer which is not the sum of $1$ or more distinct squares:
$2$, $3$, $6$, $7$, $8$, $\ldots$


The $5$th integer after $0$, $1$, $2$, $4$ which is palindromic in both decimal and ternary:
$8_{10} = 22_3$


The $5$th positive integer after $2$, $3$, $4$, $7$ which cannot be expressed as the sum of distinct pentagonal numbers


The $6$th Fibonacci number after $1$, $1$, $2$, $3$, $5$:
$8 = 3 + 5$


The $6$th highly abundant number after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $6$:
$\map \sigma 8 = 15$


The $6$th Ulam number after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $6$:
$8 = 2 + 6$


The $6$th after $1$, $2$, $4$, $5$, $6$ of the $24$ positive integers which cannot be expressed as the sum of distinct non-pythagorean primes


The $6$th positive integer after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $6$ such that all smaller positive integers coprime to it are prime


The $8$th of the trivial $1$-digit pluperfect digital invariants after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $5$, $6$, $7$:
$8^1 = 8$


The $8$th of the (trivial $1$-digit) Zuckerman numbers after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $5$, $6$, $7$:
$8 = 1 \times 8$


The $8$th of the (trivial $1$-digit) harshad numbers after $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $5$, $6$, $7$:
$8 = 1 \times 8$


The $9$th integer $n$ after $0$, $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $5$, $6$, $7$ such that $2^n$ contains no zero in its decimal representation:
$2^8 = 256$


The $9$th number after $0$, $1$, $2$, $3$, $4$, $5$, $6$, $7$ which is (trivially) the sum of the increasing powers of its digits taken in order:
$8^1 = 8$


Also see


Previous in Sequence: $1$


Previous in Sequence: $2$


Previous in Sequence: $3$


Previous in Sequence: $4$


Previous in Sequence: $5$


Previous in Sequence: $6$


Previous in Sequence: $7$


Next in Sequence: $9$ and above


Historical Note

In the mundane world, the most immediately relevant appearance of the number $8$ is the number of notes in an octave of a diatonic scale.


Sources